Interprétation de la remarque de l’ambassadeur vietnamien en Inde sur la coopération en matière de défense et d’énergie nucléaire

Interprétation de la remarque de l’ambassadeur vietnamien en Inde sur la coopération en matière de défense et d’énergie nucléaire

by Andrew Korybko.

Vietnam already has defense and nuclear technology agreements with Russia which were even mentioned in their reaffirmed strategic partnership pact which was concluded in early December during President Nguyen Xuan Phuc’s visit to Moscow, which raised eyebrows when Ambassador Pham Sanh Chau said on Friday that “only India can help Vietnam in sensitive areas like defense and nuclear technology for peaceful use”.

Vietnam’s Ambassador to India, Pham Sanh Chau, said in an interactive session on Friday that “only India can help Vietnam in sensitive areas like defense and nuclear technology for peaceful use.” This remark raised eyebrows since Vietnam already has defense and nuclear technology agreements with Russia which were even mentioned in their reaffirmed strategic partnership pact which was agreed in early December during President Nguyen Xuan Phuc’s visit to Moscow. . The purpose of this article is therefore to clarify what he probably meant by that.

The unprecedented sanctions imposed by the US-led West against Russia in response to its ongoing special military operation in Ukraine carry with them the threat of so-called “secondary sanctions”. In the Vietnamese context, it is a sword of Damocles hanging over its strategic partnership with Russia, especially in the field of defence. Nevertheless, there is a smart workaround that can be practiced and has already been proven to work, namely the purchase of weapons produced jointly by Russia and India in order to escape the threat of “secondary sanctions”. .

This method is working as evidenced by India’s Ambassador to the Philippines, Shambhu Kumaran, who confirmed last month that his country’s deal with the Philippines for BrahMos supersonic cruise missiles produced jointly with Russia will not be affected by any such sanctions because it is bilateral and does not directly involve Russia. Moscow had to approve the sale, but it is not part of this agreement more than that. The failure of the United States to impose sanctions in response suggests that this method of third-country purchases of weapons jointly produced by Russia and India may work as an effective workaround for the indefinite future.

It could be the same for cooperation with Russia in the field of nuclear energy, which is not yet sanctioned, but it should not be believed that it will never be. Russia and India are already cooperating jointly in the development of the nuclear power plant in Rooppur, their Bangladeshi partner, so there is no reason why they cannot extend this working agreement to other third countries such as Vietnam. In other words, Russia’s way of escaping illegal sanctions threats from the US-led West is to completely expand the sphere of its joint projects with India into third countries.

Vietnam is the perfect place to do this because it practices a policy of principled neutrality towards the Ukrainian conflict just like India does by not publicly condemning Russia or joining in the illegal sanctions of the US-led West against it. This is why Ambassador Chau also said on Friday that “Vietnam and India have chosen the ‘middle way’, that of peace, stability and dialogue, the way of the Buddha”. In fact, India’s courageous defiance of America’s growing multidimensional pressure against it to condemn and then sanction Russia has positioned this Great Power as a leader of the Global South.

India aims to jointly bring together a new Non-Aligned Movement (“Neo-NAM”) with Russia to create a third pole of influence in the current bipolar transition phase of the global systemic transition to multipolarity. Vietnam fits perfectly into this emerging network because of its policy of principled neutrality and its excellent relations with the two Russian-Indian leaders of the neo-NAM. With this in mind, Ambassador Chau’s remark makes a lot of sense since it seems to allude to trilateral cooperation through this model in order to evade illegal threats of “secondary sanctions” from the United States in the New Cold War. .

If this interpretation of this diplomat’s statement is correct, it would mean that Vietnam is positioning itself as the main multipolar force in ASEAN, just as India has already done in South Asia and in the countries of the South in general. Going forward, observers should pay very close attention to Vietnam’s bilateral relations with India and Russia, as well as any potential trilateral projects it may participate in with them. ASEAN is already one of the nuclei of the emerging multipolar world order, so Vietnam’s desire to become its main multipolar force speaks to its growing global importance.

Andrew Korybko

source: One World

Avic translation for International Network

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